How to Build a One Year Food Supply without Breaking Your Budget

How to Build a One Year Food Supply without Breaking Your Budget

The idea of building a large supply of food is daunting to people for many reasons. Knowing where to start, how to pay for it, and the idea of impending Armageddon often stands in the way of making the kind of preparations most of us know we need to make.

Building an emergency food supply is wise because everyone should prepare for the unexpected and it doesn’t have to break the bank. Here are some ideas for building your personal one-year food supply.

Do your Homework

There are a number of companies that specialize in providing emergency food supplies for consumers but be aware that these all come at a premium price. This plan presented here costs far less than any pre-packaged plans.

Establish Ground Rules for Using the Food Supply

  • Prepare your food Supply so it lasts. With the exception of grains and legumes, everything in your supply needs to be vacuum sealed to ensure freshness. It is important to make sure that you store all of your food supplies in a cool dry place. Extreme temperatures will reduce the shelf life of your food.
  • Eat what you store. A number of good free meal menu systems can be found on-line that help in planning which foods to eat when.
  • Have a food rotation system. As you begin building your food supply – First In, First Out – is critical in any such system. Keep your rotation system simple. Always use items that are nearing their shelf limit first before purchasing more of the same item.

Make a 52 week plan to get your Food Supply

The following is a plan for building your one-year food supply for just $5-10 per week. Each listed item represents a purchasing week in the plan.

  •  5 Cans Cream of Chicken Soup
  •  6 Pounds of Salt
  •  50 Pounds of Wheat
  •  8 Cans Tomato Soup
  •  20 Pounds of Sugar
  •  6 Pounds of Macaroni
  •  6 Pounds of Yeast
  •  8 Cans of Tuna
  •  20 Pounds of Sugar
  •  50 Pounds of Wheat
  •  8 Cans of Tomato Soup
  •  10 Pounds of Powdered Milk
  •  20 Pounds of Sugar
  •  10 Boxes of Macaroni and Cheese
  •  1 Bottle of 500 Multi-Vitamins
  •  5 Cans of Cream of Chicken Soup
  •  50 Pounds of Wheat
  •  8 Cans of Tomato Soup
  •  50 Pounds of Wheat
  •  10 Pounds of Powdered Milk
  •  20 Pounds of Sugar
  •  8 Cans of Tuna
  •  6 Pounds of Shortening
  •  50 Pounds of Wheat
  •  5 Pounds of Honey
  •  20 Pounds of Sugar
  •  20 Pounds of Sugar
  •  5 Pounds of Peanut Butter
  •  50 Pounds of Wheat
  •  7 Boxes of Macaroni and Cheese
  •  10 Pounds of Powdered Milk
  •  1 Bottle of 500 Aspirin
  •  5 cans of Cream of Chicken Soup
  •  50 Pounds of Wheat
  •  7 Boxes of Macaroni and Cheese
  •  6 Pounds of Salt
  •  20 Pounds of Sugar
  •  8 Cans of Tomato Soup
  •  50 Pounds of Wheat
  •  5 Cans of Cream of Chicken Soup
  •  20 Pounds of Sugar
  •  1 Bottle of 500 Multi-Vitamins
  •  8 Cans of Tuna
  •  50 Pounds of Wheat
  •  6 Pounds of Macaroni
  •  20 Pounds of Sugar
  •  5 Cans of Cream of Mushroom Soup
  •  5 Pounds of Honey
  •  20 Pounds of Sugar
  •  8 Cans of Tomato Soup
  •  50 Pounds of Wheat

Based on a daily diet in which you and one other person consume 2,000 calories each, the food listed above can sustain the two of you for about 312 days. That’s the better part of a full year. Cut back to about 1,750 calories each per day and this supply will last well past a year.